Favorite boppers

 
  • Favorite boppers

    In the interest of fostering discussion I thought I'd start a "what's your fav X" thread, where x is equal to the subject of the group in question.

    So, algebraically, who are your favorite boppers? Favorite branch of bop?

    I personally am a sucker for Mingus' hard bop stylings. As much as I admire his contemporaries for superior technical acheivements, Mingus is the one whose compositions are the most likely to get me moving. Particularly "Ah Um", which contains the best version of his "best" song "Fables of Faubus". This version is the most subdued and straight-jazz rendition of this classic. And I particularly like it as it is quite open to interpretation of a tone poem of the life of a criminal or some other edgy character. The sweeping horns going back and forth during the theme conjure images of passing traffic, and the main theme is the sound of someone walking down a dark rainy street in a grimy city. Love it.

    I don't wanna ill. I just wanna chill
    and keep my hand around a hundred dollar bill.
    • Remppu disse...
    • Usuário
    • Mar 10 2008, 16h34
    Hi ho
    I am a big fan of John Coltrane's fast yet very complex sax playing mixed with addicting theme melodies only used a couple of times during a song, a perfect example for such song is Mr P.C. on Giant steps (the whole album is awesome!). The solo piano parts on the album (by Tommy Flanagan) fit in really good and brings good variation in the sax sound.

    ______
    Remppu

    Ps. You certainly have the right man in the group pic ;)

  • Mingus on Mingus Ah Um is amazing.
    Miles had some good stuff on Kind of Blue, Cookin', Elevator to the Gallows, etc.
    I like Diz too, especially his earlier work. Blue n Boogie is my favorite.
    Coltrane and Parker are too delicious.

    Long walks at night--
    that's what good for the soul:
    peeking into windows
    watching tired housewives
    trying to fight off
    their beer-maddened husbands.
    -And the Moon and the Stars and the World, by Charles Bukowski.
  • Also, I like to consider Bix Beiderbecke a bopper before bop. Some of his solos and improvisations are indicative of what would come later, and he was interested in using scales outside of the blues scale that was pretty much the dominant one back in the 20's.

    Long walks at night--
    that's what good for the soul:
    peeking into windows
    watching tired housewives
    trying to fight off
    their beer-maddened husbands.
    -And the Moon and the Stars and the World, by Charles Bukowski.
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